BOOKER, Anthony Richards (Tony)

1

Anthony Richards (Tony) Booker
January 24, 1931 – August 3, 2022


It is with great sadness we announce the peaceful passing of Tony Booker on the morning of August 3rd 2022 at the age of 91. He was predeceased by his loving wife, Josephine Booker in 2012. Both are survived by their three sons Timothy (Zora), Patrick (Debbie) and Nicholas (Cherie) as well as five grandchildren (Natasha, Niki, Sydney, Morgan, Naila).


After meeting Tony in their native country of England, they left busy London and emigrated to Canada in 1958, were married and began married life in the tiny farming village of Markinch, Saskatchewan (where Tony had pre-secured a job as the village School Teacher). They moved west to BC a year later: first to Kamloops where they started their family and later to Vancouver and Ladner to raise their three boys. Here Tony enjoyed a lengthy career as an Art Teacher at Magee Secondary School in Vancouver.
A long love affair with the Gulf Islands, including a summer property on Mayne Island, led them to eventually retire to Salt Spring Island where they settled into a relaxed but vibrant retirement. A long-time member of the Salt Spring Sailing Club, Tony enjoyed sailing and generally messing-around in boats. In 2012, serious health concerns for Josephine forced a move back to Vancouver for the couple, and Tony began his ten year residence at the Independent Living community of Shannon Oaks in Vancouver.


Much appreciation to the friendly staff of Shannon Oaks for their many years creating a comfortable home and community that Tony greatly appreciated. Special thanks to Nursing staff at VGH and UBC Hospitals for their dedication, professionalism and thoughtful care.
As per Tony’s request, there will be no service. In lieu of flowers, donations in Tony’s (and Josephine’s) memory can be made to the Parkinson Society of BC.
https://www.canadahelps.org/en/charities/parkinson-society-british-columbia/

1 Comment
  1. Diana Lynn Thompson says

    Tony Booker was my Art teacher at Magee. He saw me. I was a bewildered 13-year-old in culture shock, coming from a huge working-class high school in Quebec to the small and mid-upper-class Magee. The girls in my new school wore cashmere sweater sets in soft pearly tones, while I arrived wearing beads, an embroidered jean jacket, and feather earrings. I didn’t understand why I didn’t fit in.
    Tony noticed. He gave me a safe haven — free access to the art room. He never judged my work, just helped me do my best. He was alert, supportive and serious. Keep at it, do the work…(but he was oh, so gentle when he saw someone stumble). I think – I hope- he knew how much his small acts of kindness and attention meant to me. He believed in me as an artist when I didn’t even know who I was. Years later we met again on Salt Spring and he remembered me, the girl named Toad.
    I imagine he helped many stray, uncertain students, as well as ones with easy promise. He didn’t judge. He saw what a student needed and worked quietly to help them be the best artist they could be. He never seemed to draw attention to himself. He spoke through his students, masterfully.
    Thank-you Tony. You meant so much to me.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.