We all have the potential to save a life

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March 28 Lady Minto Hospital Medical Staff Association COVID-19 Update

Every single person on Salt Spring has the potential to save a life by practising physical distancing. Never before have any of us been able to have such an incredible impact by such a small change in behaviour. Simply staying home and maintaining a physical distance from others is the single most effective measure to control and stop this pandemic. 

The address by provincial health officer Dr. Bonnie Henry yesterday gave us a glimmer of hope, but as many know, statistics can be interpreted in many different ways. Now is NOT the time to relax any of the containment measures. Rather, it is crucial that we hold the course we are on, continue to practice physical distancing, stay home, and wash our hands.  

The coming days will reveal if we are truly “flattening the curve” of new cases.

Lady Minto Hospital remains open with restrictions on visitors and all the recommended infection control measures in place. We continue to be ready and able to care for you. 

We will not post tomorrow and plan to move to twice-weekly posts because the doctors who write these have to focus their thinking and work in other directions. If there is a need for an urgent update we will post more frequently. Stay tuned! 

For now, we hope that the early indicators of slowing the infection rate in B.C. prove to be a true reflection of the course of this pandemic in our province.  

Fantastic work, Salt Springers!  

Here are practical pieces of advice on stress management during this crisis.

Some degree of anxiety, of course, is only normal. Humans developed into social creatures to survive, so isolation can be an uncomfortable state for many. Overall, the long-term negative effects of physical isolation should be considerably lessened by the knowledge that everyone is experiencing them. Keep in contact with others by every means possible while maintaining physical distance.

It is important to keep busy. Do not spend the whole day on social media but instead, establish a routine that gives structure to your days. You can do a lot at home. Daily to-do lists can be helpful in making small, achievable goals. 

Keeping active, both physically and mentally, is also vitally important. Try to get outside, go for a walk or hike, work in your garden, or do some cardio or stretching in your home. Too much information can be anxiety-inducing, while not knowing anything at all can also make us feel anxious. Read the news, preferably just once per day, from a reliable source of information so you feel empowered and knowledgeable about the Covid situation. 

While we are social creatures by nature, we also need our space at times, so there are bound to be tensions within households. Make sure to let everyone have some time alone each day if they need it. Everyone’s a little anxious, and it might not take much for people to get upset or angry. Talk to your family members openly, and be gentle with one another. This is especially important with children.

For more on living in self-isolation, please see this delightful video by Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmhRTDKYpHc

Acknowledgments to the Guardian Newspaper for some of the above stress-management ideas.

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